Music

Sonnets and Chansons“, a 1592 collection of duets by the celebrated Franco-Flemish composer Jean de Castro, is now available in two volumes of easy-to-read spiral bound books.  They are of intermediate difficulty and suitable for all types of instruments and voices.  The price per volume is $17 which includes postage within the U.S.  To order, send $17 (or $34 for both volumes) via PayPal to pneumantartold@gmail.com and include your mailing address.  Books are usually mailed within a day or two.  Write to pneumantartold@gmail.com for more information.

Columbia Passage” is an original composition by Phil Neuman for Recorder Orchestra commissioned by the Portland Recorder Society.  It begins with a theme depicting the Columbia Gorge and Oregon history and continues with variations in a number of styles including imitative polyphony, ragtime, jazz, and more.  Duration: 12 minutes.  Available in two versions:
– For 9 or 10 parts for sopranino through contrabass recorders (optional 10th part for garklein.)  Cost is $49 which includes 10 individual parts, score, and postage within the U.S.  To purchase, send $49 via PayPal to the email address above.
–  For 6 parts for sopranino through bass recorders.  Cost is $45 which includes 6 individual parts, score, and postage within the U.S.  To purchase, send $45 via PayPal to the email address above.

“This piece tumbles down from northern climates to the Pacific Ocean with energy and splashing among all the parts along the way.  Although it begins and ends with the same theme, the musical phrase has evolved by the time it hits the mouth of the river.  In between are melodies and rhythms that bounce between the parts, making each a joy to play.  Sly moments of hitting rocks with accidentals as well as an eddy or two occur. There is not a dull moment in the passage of the mighty Columbia River in this piece!”
Susy Wilcox

“At the 2018 Columbia Gorge Early Music Retreat, I was excited to perform the world premiere of “Columbia Passage,” composed and directed by the esteemed Phil Neuman. How thrilled I was when he asked me to play the soprano solo!  A lovely piece, evoking past and present essences of the mighty Columbia.”
Patty Zurflieh

“I really cannot say enough good stuff about Columbia Passage.  Not only does it sing with beautiful melodies and challenging rhythms, it plays perfectly on recorders.  Phil Neuman understands the ranges of recorders and uses that to weave the sights and sounds of the beloved Columbia Gorge and Oregon’s rich history.  A perfect and must have for any recorder orchestra wanting a worthwhile challenge with extraordinary musical payoff.”
Laura Kuhlman

“Columbia Passage is a wonderful piece that offers something for every voice. The melody weaves its way through several genres seamlessly including a fugue, as a traditional folk tune, ragtime, and jazz.  It is fun to play and the melody stays with you after the piece is done (the sign of a great tune).  When we played Columbia Passage at its debut at the PRS Early Music Workshop held at Menucha on the Columbia Gorge, there was a rousing round of applause at the conclusion of the piece by all 55 participants. Everyone loved it, from sopranos to contrabasses. It was an instant hit!  This piece is fun for audiences as well due to the changes in tempo, genre, syncopation, and the charm of the melody itself.  5 stars for Columbia Passage!”
Debbie McMeel

Phil Neuman has arranged and transcribed over a thousand works for recorders and other early instruments, many of which are available as pdfs.  Categories include Baroque, Renaissance, Medieval, and Ancient music, as well as Erik Satie, ragtime, jazz, British Brass Band and Catalonian Sardana Band music.  Please write to pneumantartold@gmail.com to ask about your interests, availability and costs.

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